Evolution of population II stars.
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Evolution of population II stars.

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Published by Dudley Observatory in Albany, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Stars -- Evolution -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementA. G. Davis Philip, editor.
SeriesDudley Observatory reports ;, rept. no. 4
ContributionsPhilip, A. G. Davis, ed., State University of New York at Stony Brook.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQB806 .E9
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 216 p.
Number of Pages216
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5451607M
LC Control Number73153666

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The evolution of population II stars and mass loss and stellar evolutionCited by: 3. Population II stars formed when the abundance of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium was low. Population I stars formed later, after mass lost by dying members of the first generations of stars had seeded the interstellar medium with elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. The evolution of Population II stars into the red-giant region in the H-R diagram is investigated following a method recently used by Kippenhahn, Temesrary, and Biermann (Z. Astrophys. 46, , ) who emphasized the importance of the structure of the hydrogen convection zone to determine the radius of red giants, and consequently their position in the H-R : Pierre Demarque. About this book. Evolution of Stars and Stellar Populations is a comprehensive presentation of the theory of stellar evolution and its application to the study of stellar populations in galaxies. Taking a unique approach to the subject, this self-contained text introduces first the theory of stellar evolution in a clear and accessible manner, with particular emphasis placed on explaining the evolution with time of .

Evolution of Stars and Stellar Populations is a comprehensive presentation of the theory of stellar evolution and its application to the study of stellar populations in galaxies. Taking a unique approach to the subject, this self-contained text introduces first the theory of stellar evolution in a clear and accessible manner, with particular emphasis placed on explaining the evolution with time of Reviews: 5. Evolution of stars and stellar populations/Maurizio Salaris, Santi Cassisi. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN X (cloth:alk. paper) ISBN X (cloth:alk. paper) ISBN (pbk.:alk. paper) ISBN (pbk.:alk. paper) 1. Stars—Evolution. 2. Stars—Populations. 3. Population II consists of the oldest stars and clusters, which formed about 1,,, to 15,,, years ago. Members of this class presumably were created from interstellar gas clouds that emerged shortly after the big bang, a state of extremely high temperature and density from which the universe is believed to have originated. The best evidence for a distinct population of stars would be a lower cutoff in the metallicity distribution of Population II stars. If the first stars had the same IMF as today, with a lower cutoff at about M, one might expect stars smaller than M (whose lifetime exceeds the age of the Universe) to display arbitrarily low metallicity.

Population II, or metal-poor, stars are those with relatively little of the elements heavier than helium. These objects were formed during an earlier time of the universe. Intermediate Population II stars are common in the bulge near the centre of our galaxy, whereas Population II stars found in the galactic halo are older and thus more metal-poor. The evolution of population II stars. By Jr. I. Iben and J. Faulkner. Abstract. Evolutionary paths of several double energy-source models compared with horizontal branch in metal- weak Population II clusters to obtain stellar structure and mass for best fi. The stars we observe throughout the universe today all contain metals, such as Population I stars, which are metal-rich, and Population II stars that are metal-poor. Population I stars contain approximately % metals, they are found in the spiral arms or in the disks of galaxies. Population II stars, containing only % metal content in. Books shelved as population: The Coming Population Crash: and Our Planet's Surprising Future by Fred Pearce, The Population Bomb by Paul R. Ehrlich, Fata.